Fla. Gov Scott delivers the cocoa puffs

 It is kinda like Marco Rubio’s failure to understand US history as demonstrated in his announcement address (www.miamitomorrowmagazine.com). This time it is Gov. Richard Scott traveling to California to steal cargo from west coast ports only to return with nothing except an inevitable Jones Act consignment  from Jaxport to Puerto Rico.

While Scott claimed he convinced California-based Nestle to shift its chocolate shipment to Jaxport, In a statement Wednesday, Nestle USA said its decision to move cargo out of Jacksonville was made “to accommodate [customer] requests.”

Nestle said it will only be shifting a majority, not all, of its shipments to Jacksonville. The company estimates it will be shipping nearly 500 loads annually from Jacksonville, representing close to 71 percent of its exports to Puerto Rico.

The remaining exports will continue to be shipped out of a little Jones Act port in New Jersey, according to some surprising actual reporting by the Journal of Commerce.

It is all about the Jones Act and Scott hasn’t a clue what that means. (US built ships with US crew only between US ports.)

Nestle must ship to Puerto Rico aboard a Jones Act carrier departing a US port. California has no Jones Act carriers heading to Puerto Rico, nor does the Port of New York/New Jersey. But Jaxport has several Jones Act carriers calling Puerto Rico, in fact the only ones near the Nestle distribution center in Altanta.

It just so happened that the company recently closed its distribution centers in Puerto Rico, choosing instead to  ship directly to customers or via distributors out of Nestle’s Atlanta distribution center, which feeds the ports of Jacksonville and Savannah, over the company’s Allentown, Pennsylvania center, which ships out of ports in Philadelphia, New York and New Jersey.

The New York ports are a mess and Savannah has no regular Jones Act service to Puerto Rico so the shippers opted for Atlanta, Jaxport, Puerto Rico routing.

 


Major maritime voice airs Miami's port plans to challenge West Coast ports

Florida at bat

Peter Tirschwell, Chief JOC Content Officer | Apr 08, 20152:16PM EDT       

 

For Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who has invested $850 million in his state’s seaports, including dredging the Port Miami to 50 feet, the recently concluded West Coast port labor dispute is an opportunity not to be missed.

That is why the governor is headed to California later this week to promote Florida as an alternative gateway for import cargo. His target audience is shippers disillusioned with West Coast ports after essentially a year of unnecessary disruption tied to the ILWU longshore labor negotiations. Many are ready, if not to withdraw entirely from the West Coast, to minimize their exposure in coming years — such was the complete absence of concern for the customer as the negotiations spiraled out of control last fall. That will mean long-term diversions are on their way to Canada and the East and Gulf coasts; there’s no doubt that’s happening.

And with the expanded Panama Canal opening in almost exactly a year, allowing ships of up to 14,000-TEU capacity to pass through the canal’s locks, what better time could there be to pitch Florida as an alternative gateway for U.S. container imports, not just destined for Florida but also to points beyond?

“These delays have presented challenges to many shippers whose businesses rely on the ability to efficiently move goods across the nation, and many have indicated that they plan to divert cargo from the West Coast,” Scott said in a March 12 letter to addressed to shipping industry professionals. “Florida ports are undoubtedly a solution to this problem. Florida has the infrastructure to move your goods across the nation once they reach our ports.”

Yes, some shippers are to be found in California. But they’re also in places such as Bentonville, Columbus, Minneapolis, Atlanta and Charlotte, and many other U.S., European, and Asian cities. And judging from the numbers, Florida has a long way to go to get on their radar screens. If the goal is to establish Miami as a gateway for import containers moving beyond the state and into the broader Southeast, or even beyond, the numbers suggest a long road ahead.

According to PIERS, a sister brand of The Journal of Commerce within IHS Maritime and Trade, Florida’s share of total U.S. container imports has barely budged over the past six years; it was 4.61 percent in 2009 and 4.83 percent in 2014. Miami’s share actually dropped, from 1.88 to 1.72 percent over the five-year period. And Florida ports are lagging the U.S. in growth: Since 2009, Florida ports’ volume saw a compound annual growth rate of 3.7 percent, while U.S ports total saw a CAGR of 4 percent during the same five-year period.

Just within the intensely competitive Southeast, where ports such as Miami are competing against established and fast-growing competitors such as Savannah, Miami handled 6.5 percent of Asia imports arriving in the Southeast versus 47 percent at Savannah, 25 percent at Norfolk and 14 percent at Charleston.

Finally, Miami didn’t benefit at all from diversions that occurred last year; its import volumes fell, down 2 percent in 2014 versus 2013, while Savannah’s imports as a diversion port of choice were up 17 percent, Charleston’s were up 12 percent, and Jacksonville’s grew 9 percent, according to PIERS data.

Port leaders in South Florida, however, are convinced their future is bright. With on-dock rail, a new tunnel leading to the interstate highway system, its 50-feet of depth and multiple rail departures per day from the Florida East Coast Railroad, Miami feels it’s ready to make its presence felt. “We believe we will double our throughput over the next eight to 10 years,” Miami Port Director Juan Kuryla told the JOC.com Reynolds Hutchins in an interview this month.  

Miami’s relatively small numbers are leaving Scott open to attack from California port advocates struggling to restore the reputation of their ports. “Florida doesn’t have anywhere near the demand, proximity to markets or infrastructure needed to support major port operations even remotely close to California’s port complexes,” John McLaurin, president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association, wrote in the Los Angeles Business Journal.

The debate with California may be a public one, but, in private, you have to assume that other Southeast ports are also pouring cold water on Miami’s aspirations. Florida can’t be looked at as a single port competitor because Jacksonville is a bona-fide Southeast port that is seeing some growth from West Coast diversions. But for Jacksonville and other Florida ports, the real challenge is convincing shippers they are the most effective gateways for cargo headed to the rapidly expanding Southeast, and even to the Midwest. An on-dock rail facility at Jacksonville’s TraPac terminal, set to open later this year, is a step toward that goal. However, competitors Charleston, Savannah and Virginia developed on-dock rail facilities for its Asia-focused terminals long ago.

Contact Peter Tirschwell at ptirschwell@joc.com and follow him on Twitter: @petertirschwell.

 


Cuba says US companies won’t get preferential treatment

By: Reuters | Apr 07 2015 at 05:17 PM | International Trade  

U.S. companies can expect the same treatment as those from the rest of the world, receiving neither special benefits nor punishment, if there is a further commercial opening between Cuba and the United States, Cuba’s foreign trade minister said.

“U.S. business people will enjoy the same treatment that is offered to the rest of the world that has ties with the island today,” Rodrigo Malmierca, the minister of foreign trade and investment, said in an interview published in official Cuban media.

“It’s true that we will view positively, once the U.S. laws permit it, that they will be able to trade and invest. But that does not imply a preferential treatment,” Malmierca said.

The United States and Cuba announced in December they would restore diplomatic relations and seek to normalize trade and travel that were disrupted more than 50 years ago during the Cold War.

U.S. President Barack Obama has relaxed some parts of the U.S. economic embargo against Cuba. Although he has authority to do more, he needs the Republican-controlled Congress to remove the embargo definitively.

The opening has generated tremendous interest from U.S. companies looking to crack a market that has long been closed, but even with a relaxation of the embargo U.S. companies need an agreement from the Cuban government or a Cuban state company to do business on the Caribbean island. (Reuters)

 


Every man for herself as FEMA announces $100 million port security grant scramble

About $100 million will be available to various port authorities, facility operators, and state and local government agencies who have developed an Area Maritime Security Plan as part of the 2015 FEMA port security grant program

 Eligibility Criteria is established pursuant to the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002, as amended (MTSA) wherein DHS established a risk-based grant program to support maritime security risk management.

 This year funding is directed towards the implementation of AMSPs and Facility Security Plans (FSP) among port authorities, facility operators, and state and local government agencies that are required to provide port security services.

 Application Submission Deadline: May 19, 2015 at 11:59 PM EDT

 In administering the grant program, national, economic, energy, and strategic defense concerns based upon the most current risk assessments available will be considered. 

 This year there will be no Port Area Group Designations. Instead, all Port Areas will be selected for funding through the FY 2015 PSGP competitive review process. 

For the most part those who were eligible to apply in 2014 will be eligible this year except “Applications for the purpose of providing a service, product, project, or investment justifications (IJ) on behalf of another entity such as sub-recipients or a consortia are ineligible for funding. Applications will only be accepted and considered for funding from direct recipients.”

 (so let us know if you need a hand)

Only one (1) application per eligible entity within each Port Area is permitted. Each application may contain multiple IJs. An investment justification supports the funding of a proposed project. The location where the project is primarily implemented is considered the Port Area of the application. Applicants with facilities in multiple Port Areas may submit one (1) application per Port Area. Since program funding is risk based by Port Area, no single application should include investment justifications for projects intended to be implemented in multiple Port Areas. For example, state entities that operate in multiple Port Areas within the state must submit separate applications to fund projects in each of these Port Areas.

 

Cost Share or Match

 

 There is a Cost-Match requirement for this program. All PSGP award recipients must provide a non-Federal match (cash or in-kind) supporting at least 25 percent of the total project cost for each proposed project. Exceptions to the cost match requirement may apply. Please see Appendix B – PSGP Funding Guidelines for details. The non-Federal share can be cash or in-kind, with the exception of construction activities, which must be a cash-match (hard).

 

The steps involved in applying for an award under this program are:

1. Applying for, updating or verifying their DUNS Number;

2. Applying for, updating or verifying their EIN Number;

3. Updating or verifying their SAM Number;

4. Establishing an Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR) in Grants.gov;

5. Submitting an initial application in Grants.gov; and

6. Submitting the complete application in ND Grants.

NOTE: If you are going to apply for this funding opportunity and have not obtained a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number and/or are not currently registered in the System for Award Management (SAM), please take immediate action to obtain a DUNS Number, if applicable, and then to register immediately in SAM. It may take 4 weeks or more after you submit your SAM registration before your registration is active in SAM, then an additional 24 hours for Grants.gov to recognize your information. Information on obtaining a DUNS number and registering in SAM is available from Grants.gov at: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html

 

 

 


Great News for Florida space port: US and Russia agree to new space station and joint Mars effort!

 

110523-multi_nasa_station_hmed-3p_grid-7x2

The Russian space agency Roscosmos and its US counterpart NASA have agreed to build a new space station after the current International Space Station (ISS) The Russian space agency Roscosmos and its US counterpart NASA have agreed to build a new space station after the current International Space Station (ISS) expires and cooperate on the exploration of Mars.

The operation of the ISS was prolonged until 2024.
“We have agreed that Roscosmos and NASA will be working together on the program of a future space station," Roscosmos chief Igor Komarov said during a news conference on Saturday.
The talks were held at Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
The two agencies will be unifying their standards and systems of manned space programs, according to Komarov. “This is very important to future missions and stations.”
The ISS life cycle was to expire in 2020. “Under the ISS program the door will be open to otherparticipants,” Komarov told reporters.
The next goal for the two agencies is a joint mission to Mars, NASA chief Charles Bolden told journalists.
Roscosmos and NASA are working with each other and other partners on a global roadmap of space exploration, Bolden said. “Our area of cooperation will be Mars. We are discussing how best to use the resources, the finance, we are setting time frames and distributing efforts in order to avoid duplication.”
Read more
NASA is currently committed to commercializing space activities. “We are consciously moving away from government financing of low-orbit missions,” Bolden said, adding that sometimes NASA “has been criticized” for that.
At the same time, he stressed that the US has not abandoned its goal of returning to the moon. In the future, NASA is planning “to attract more private developers to our joint exploration projects of the Moon and Mars,”Bolden said.

expires and cooperate on the exploration of Mars.

The operation of the ISS was prolonged until 2024.
“We have agreed that Roscosmos and NASA will be working together on the program of a future space station," Roscosmos chief Igor Komarov said during a news conference on Saturday.
The talks were held at Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
The two agencies will be unifying their standards and systems of manned space programs, according to Komarov. “This is very important to future missions and stations.”
The ISS life cycle was to expire in 2020. “Under the ISS program the door will be open to otherparticipants,” Komarov told reporters.
The next goal for the two agencies is a joint mission to Mars, NASA chief Charles Bolden told journalists.
Roscosmos and NASA are working with each other and other partners on a global roadmap of space exploration, Bolden said. “Our area of cooperation will be Mars. We are discussing how best to use the resources, the finance, we are setting time frames and distributing efforts in order to avoid duplication.”
NASA is currently committed to commercializing space activities. “We are consciously moving away from government financing of low-orbit missions,” Bolden said, adding that sometimes NASA “has been criticized” for that.
At the same time, he stressed that the US has not abandoned its goal of returning to the moon. In the future, NASA is planning “to attract more private developers to our joint exploration projects of the Moon and Mars,”Bolden said.

 


Panama plans to compete with Suez for super-post Panamax 20,000 TEUs

Panama Canal sets sights on new $17 billion expansion project

By: Reuters | Mar 26 2015 at 05:10 PM | Liner Shipping   | Ports & Terminals  

As it enters the final stretch of a massive expansion, the Panama Canal Authority is setting its sights on an even more ambitious project worth up to $17 billion that would allow it to handle the world’s biggest ships.

Workers are now installing giant, 22-story lock gates to accommodate larger “Post-Panamax” ships through the Canal, one of the world’s busiest maritime routes.

The project involves building a third set of locks on the Canal. It is being headed by Italy’s Salini Impregilo and Spain’s Sacyr, and should open on April 1, 2016.

But Jorge Quijano, who leads the Panama Canal Authority, is already looking beyond this project to a fourth set of locks which would serve a new generation of even bigger ships that can carry 20,000 containers.

“Looking at our geology and the experience we gained with this current expansion, we estimate it’s a project that could cost between $16 billion and $17 billion,” he told Reuters, adding it would allow Panama to compete head-to-head with Egypt’s Suez Canal.

The Panama Canal Authority has long talked about building a fourth set of locks but Quijano said it is now for the first time seriously studying the project.

He says container ship traffic through the Canal has risen around 3 to 4 percent in the last few months due to a backlog at U.S. West Coast ports, which were hit by a now-settled labor dispute disrupting trans-Pacific trade..

“It has had a positive impact for us, but the Suez Canal has been the big winner because they can handle the Post-Panamax ships,” Quijano said.

If the Canal goes ahead with the project, Quijano says it could be completed within 15 years and that financing options include issuing bonds and using the Canal’s own revenues.

China Harbour Engineering Company Ltd (CHEC), a subsidiary of state-owned China Communications Construction Co Ltd, has voiced interest in building and financing a fourth set of locks in Panama, and Quijano said company officials met with him this week.

Further north in Nicaragua, a little-known Chinese businessman has vowed to build a $50 billion canal across the country to rival Panama’s, although some industry experts are deeply skeptical, pointing to the high costs, environmental challenges and the firm’s lack of experience in such projects.

The Panama Canal’s current expansion plan was originally set at $5.25 billion but the costs rose and the administrator became locked in a dispute with building consortium Grupo Unidos Por el Canal (GUPC), which built the third set of locks. Quijano said GUPC has submitted claims totaling $2.3 billion to date.

Giuseppe Quarta, GUPC’s CEO, says he is unsure whether its members would be interested in bidding to build a fourth set of locks, saying the Canal Authority has repeatedly rejected its claims in the dispute.

Quijano says the Canal has already lost around $400 million in revenue because of project delays caused by the spat.

The giant new locks sit alongside those of the existing Panama Canal and include a complex reservoir system that will empty and fill the lock chambers using gravity rather than pumps.

Sections of the 100-year-old waterway are being dredged to take ships with a greater draft.

Any new project to build a fourth set of locks will live or die by trade flows, says Maersk Line, a unit of conglomerate A.P. Moller-Maersk. It is a major customer of the Panama Canal, crossing it 300 to 350 times a year.

“The big question for any future expansion of the Panama Canal is will trade growth sustain that extra investment,” said Robbert Jan van Trooijen, Maersk Line’s CEO for Latin America and the Caribbean. “For me, to see any of those (mega) ships coming near Latin America, that’s the very distant future.” (Reuters)


SOUTHEAST ports celebrate Left Coast losses

East Coast sees ‘land of opportunity’ In wake of West Coast port concerns

about 2 hours ago

East Coast ports look to see significant long-term container volume growth in the wake of West Coast labor and congestion issues, according to opening session speakers at the JAXPORT Logistics & Intermodal Conference.

“There is going to be a monumental change here,” Brian Taylor, chief executive officer of the Jacksonville (Fla.) Port Authority, said today [March 24] at the conference at the Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

In a panel session during which he was joined by fellow top port executives of the region.

Taylor termed the future outlook as “the South Atlantic land of opportunity,” adding that shippers without significant distribution centers on the East Coast are now moving in that direction, and more shippers are looking to trans-Suez Canal routings from Asia as well.

Curtis Foltz, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority, said that, whereas East Coast ports are “never going to be a replacement” for West Coast gateways, the Port of Savannah has seen three times greater than projected container volume growth since October.

Stating that West Coast issues extend beyond labor concerns, Foltz said Southeast ports need a long-term plan to stay ahead of the curve, including deeper harbors, as advancing in Savannah, as well as better capabilities for efficiently moving containers inland by rail and truck.

Paul Cozza, chief executive officer of the North Carolina State Ports Authority, said, “There’s going to be really a material shift to the East Coast. We need to step up and provide the service they [shippers] need.”

In welcoming remarks, Clarence Gooden, executive vice president and chief commercial officer at Jacksonville-based Class I rail firm CSX Corp., said, “The East Coast ports are going to benefit greatly off this disaster on the West Coast,” which, he said, is “probably going to have more strategic implications in the near term than the opening of the [expanded] Panama Canal.”


Dozens of dreamers lining up for ferry permits to Cuba

 

Images

Brian Hall has a Cuba Dream. He’s named it “CubaKat,” all part of his business plan to revive the once popular ferry service from Florida to Cuba.

Back in the 50s, before Fidel Castro’s revolution and the resulting U.S. embargo on the communist island, taking ferries from Key West to Havana was a daily option for American tourists.

Hall has already purchased one catamaran in the Bahamas, planning to ferry Americans from a marina in Marathon, in the Florida Keys, to Cuba. The trip would take less than 4 hours.

"The Cuban side — they have done nothing but open their arms,” he said. "They want us to come so bad. It's like the Berlin Wall has fallen and they're begging for us to come."

Hall and half a dozen other American entrepreneurs have begun applying with the U.S. Treasury Department for future licenses to put American tourists willing to pay upwards of $300 onto catamarans and ships for the 90 mile journey through the Florida Straits.

So far, the Treasury Department is making no public comment about a timeline — when or even if ferry service will resume, but these would-be ferry operators want to be the first in line.

United America’s Joe Hinson, who is based in Miami, wants to bring his big, Baja Ferry over from Mexico to do the same from Florida to Cuba. Those ships are larger, feature cabins and a casino and would be a more relaxed, overnight, 10-hour cruise.

“We’re quite comfortable that it’s one of those situations where [it’s just] ‘build it and they will come’,” Hinson said.

The U.S. and Cuba’s efforts at normalizing diplomatic relations are ongoing, as both work to reopen their respective embassies. The changing relationship also reveals the market is there for Cuba-curious Americans eager for an open-water trip to the past.

Onboard the Key West Express, which offers daily ferry service between Ft. Myers and Key West, Mike Hazelhoff of Minnesota said “I would definitely go. I’ll take the first ferry.” His wife Sally added, “I would like to go, mainly to experience something new. It would be on my bucket list!”

Christopher Smith of San Francisco said, “I’d love to go to Cuba. It’s been closed to U.S. citizens for so long, it seems like it would be a wonderful experience to socialize with the people and the culture and kinda get a feel for Cuba."

Cuba and the U.S. State Department hope to reopen their respective embassies in mid-April. Meanwhile, these ferry boat buying entrepreneurs believe the sky’s the limit for profits, if the government’s wave of normalization begins to allow it.


PortaNY&NJ benefit from left coast strike - Fla ports too small to matter

Zepol’s data shows severe impact on US trade from West-Coast port issues

By: AJOT | Mar 11 2015 at 05:29 PM | Ports & Terminals  

Zepol reports that total U.S. container imports are down over 5 percent this year, compared to January and February of 2014. Nearly the entire decline in imports was attributed to West Coast ports. The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which make up a combined 40 percent of U.S. container imports, declined by 19 and 20 percent so far in 2015. East Coast ports have reaped the benefit, especially the port of New York/Newark, which increased container imports by 8 percent this year.

“The decline along the West Coast has lead to diverted shipments and a surplus in volume across the Atlantic and Gulf Coast,” confirms Zepol’s CEO and trade data expert Paul Rasmussen. “Due to these events, it’s the first time in over 11 years the port of New York/Newark has passed Long Beach as the second-largest port in the United States.”

Total U.S. imports by TEUs (twenty-foot containers) dropped from 2.93 million in January through February of 2014 to 2.78 million in 2015. Combined, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have declined by over 230,000 TEUs compared to the first two months of 2014.

Most East Coast and Gulf-Coast ports haven’t seen decay, but growth in containers. The port of New York/Newark grew by over 34,000 TEUs. The port of Savannah increased 20 percent with an increase of over 40,000 TEUs and Houston rose 29 percent, by nearly 31,000 TEUs.


Port of Oakland says no to business as usual

Port of Oakland says no to business as usual

By: AJOT | Mar 05 2015 at 10:58 AM | Ports & Terminals  

Change needed as West Coast recovery begins

Disruptions from waterfront labor negotiations have waned, but don’t expect a return to business as usual at West Coast ports. “The old methods won’t work any longer,” Port of Oakland executive director Chris Lytle said here today.

Addressing shippers and other stakeholders at a meeting of The Waterfront Coalition, Mr. Lytle said his industry must change, “We can’t go back to the way it was; that’s not acceptable,” he told an audience that included federal maritime commission Chairman Mario Cordero. “We have to do a better job for our customers if we want to hold onto our market share.”

Mr. Lytle joined other West Coast port executives in addressing the aftermath of nine months of labor-management disputes on the waterfront. The longshore contract impasse ended February 20 with a tentative settlement of a new contract for ports from Seattle to San Diego.

Ports now are digging out from a cargo backlog that has hampered retailers and other shippers in the US. Mr. Lytle called for a number of improvements to reshape his industry as recovery from the labor dispute gets underway. They include: 
“We need a new mindset for negotiating,” Mr. Lytle said. “What we just went through was the worst experience in my professional career. I don’t want to go through that again.”

  • Reduced transaction times for harbor truck drivers who can spend more than two hours inside marine terminals picking up cargo;
  • Better measurement of terminal operating performance; and
  • A new labor-management relationship.

Mr. Lytle said there is an opportunity for ports to play a greater role in labor relations by working with labor and management for greater collaboration.

The Port of Oakland does not hire longshore labor. That is the role of terminal operators and shipping lines in the Pacific Maritime Association. Nevertheless, Mr. Lytle said the port will meet with local labor officials and encourage them to take part in talks with shippers who rely on the Port of Oakland to move their cargo. “Better understanding of shipper needs can lead to better outcomes in future bargaining,” he added.

Mr. Lytle said the port will work with terminal operators to develop uniform methods of collecting and distributing performance data. Shippers and the truck drivers they hire have asked for the information to streamline the pick up and delivery of containerized cargo.

“The port will also work with leasing companies to improve the availability of truck chassis,” Mr. Lytle added. These are the trailers used to haul cargo containers over the road. Chassis have been in short supply at all West Coast sports during the recent cargo build up. Mr. Lytle indicated that the Port will work toward a common pool of the trailers to prevent shortages from recurring.


2015 FEMA funds threatened by congressional hjijinx

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) remains hopeful Congress will act this week to avoid a lapse in Department of Homeland Security (DHS) appropriations. However, without an annual appropriation, impacted FEMA staff will only be able to provide services that apply to the safety of human life or the protection of property. To prepare for this possibility, we are working to update our contingency plans for executing an orderly shutdown of activities that would be affected by a lapse in appropriations. During a lapse in appropriations, the impacts to our stakeholders will be as follows: All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

To prepare for this possibility, we are working to update our contingency plans for executing an orderly shutdown of activities that would be affected by a lapse in appropriations. During a lapse in appropriations, the impacts to our stakeholders will be as follows: All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

• Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

• Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

• Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

However, without an annual appropriation, impacted FEMA staff will only be able to provide services that apply to the safety of human life or the protection of property. To prepare for this possibility, we are working to update our contingency plans for executing an orderly shutdown of activities that would be affected by a lapse in appropriations. During a lapse in appropriations, the impacts to our stakeholders will be as follows: All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

• Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments

• Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments around the country, will be delayed. The current FY 2014 SAFER application period will close automatically on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. EST. FEMA will be unable to provide technical assistance to applicants during the lapse. Manual requests for other grant reimbursements will also not be processed during the shutdown as there will be no one available to process them. Some jurisdictions, such as the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa, are currently under a manual draw down process for their preparedness grants, which will halt during a lapse in appropriations. In general, ongoing grant-funded projects for which funding has been awarded, obligated, and released by FEMA will not be affected by a lapse in FY 2015 appropriations. If no other hold has been placed, work on these projects can proceed

• Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments around the country, will be delayed. The current FY 2014 SAFER application period will close automatically on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. EST. FEMA will be unable to provide technical assistance to applicants during the lapse. Manual requests for other grant reimbursements will also not be processed during the shutdown as there will be no one available to process them. Some jurisdictions, such as the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa, are currently under a manual draw down process for their preparedness grants, which will halt during a lapse in appropriations. In general, ongoing grant-funded projects for which funding has been awarded, obligated, and released by FEMA will not be affected by a lapse in FY 2015 appropriations. If no other hold has been placed, work on these projects can proceed unimpeded by the lack of FY 2015 appropriations. Grantees are advised to submit all required Semi-Annual Performance Reports and Federal Financial Status Reports (SF-425) that are overdue now before the close of business on Friday, February 27, 2015, so that they are current and up to date on reporting requirements. Delinquent reports can and will result in system-based holds and grantees will be unable to draw funds out of PARS if they remain delinquent.

However, without an annual appropriation, impacted FEMA staff will only be able to provide services that apply to the safety of human life or the protection of property. To prepare for this possibility, we are working to update our contingency plans for executing an orderly shutdown of activities that would be affected by a lapse in appropriations. During a lapse in appropriations, the impacts to our stakeholders will be as follows: All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments around the country, will be delayed. The current FY 2014 SAFER application period will close automatically on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. EST. FEMA will be unable to provide technical assistance to applicants during the lapse. Manual requests for other grant reimbursements will also not be processed during the shutdown as there will be no one available to process them. Some jurisdictions, such as the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa, are currently under a manual draw down process for their preparedness grants, which will halt during a lapse in appropriations. In general, ongoing grant-funded projects for which funding has been awarded, obligated, and released by FEMA will not be affected by a lapse in FY 2015 appropriations. If no other hold has been placed, work on these projects can proceed unimpeded by the lack of FY 2015 appropriations. Grantees are advised to submit all required Semi-Annual Performance Reports and Federal Financial Status Reports (SF-425) that are overdue now before the close of business on Friday, February 27, 2015, so that they are current and up to date on reporting requirements. Delinquent reports can and will result in system-based holds and grantees will be unable to draw funds out of PARS if they remain delinquent.

To prepare for this possibility, we are working to update our contingency plans for executing an orderly shutdown of activities that would be affected by a lapse in appropriations. During a lapse in appropriations, the impacts to our stakeholders will be as follows: All FEMA Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Federal staff will be furloughed. Fiscal Year 2015 Preparedness Grant funds yet to be appropriated must be awarded prior to Sept. 30, 2015. A lapse in appropriations reduces the amount of time FEMA will have available to complete all the required actions associated with awarding these funds. The following required steps or actions needed for FEMA to award most FY 2015 Preparedness Grants will be impacted or halted: • Completion of Funding Opportunity Announcements • Departmental review and clearance process • Required Secretarial decisional briefings • Congressional briefings • Allocation announcements • Opening of application period • Grantee application submissions • Final allocations determinations (competitive programs) • Award processing Grantees will have no access to FEMA staff for technical assistance or answers to grant questions. There will be no support for grantees to process grant amendments, apply for extensions, conduct budget and Environmental and Historic Preservation (EHP) reviews, or seek additional grant-related assistance. There will be no headquarters or regional program staff available to provide assistance with new reporting requirements recently announced in the FY14 preparedness grant awards. There will be no staff available to resolve rejected payment requests, problems related to holds, missing reports, or to reset passwords. All GPD federal and contract staff will be furloughed, so no GPD help desks will be staffed, including the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (ASKCSID), ASK-GMD for Grant Operations, and Assistance to Firefighters Grants Help Desk. Most grantees may continue to draw down awarded grant funds managed in the FEMA Response, Recovery, Mitigation, National Preparedness and GPD divisions (but not the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER), Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG), or Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) grants). Because manual approval is completed in the AFG program office for all payment requests, SAFER, AFG and FP&S program grantees will not be able to draw down funds during a lapse in appropriations. Processing of incoming applications for FY 2014 AFG or SAFER awards, impacting thousands of fire departments around the country, will be delayed. The current FY 2014 SAFER application period will close automatically on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. EST. FEMA will be unable to provide technical assistance to applicants during the lapse. Manual requests for other grant reimbursements will also not be processed during the shutdown as there will be no one available to process them. Some jurisdictions, such as the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa, are currently under a manual draw down process for their preparedness grants, which will halt during a lapse in appropriations. In general, ongoing grant-funded projects for which funding has been awarded, obligated, and released by FEMA will not be affected by a lapse in FY 2015 appropriations. If no other hold has been placed, work on these projects can proceed unimpeded by the lack of FY 2015 appropriations. Grantees are advised to submit all required Semi-Annual Performance Reports and Federal Financial Status Reports (SF-425) that are overdue now before the close of business on Friday, February 27, 2015, so that they are current and up to date on reporting requirements. Delinquent reports can and will result in system-based holds and grantees will be unable to draw funds out of PARS if they remain delinquent.